Dazed and Confused

07.31.15

It’s all been so rough lately, and hopefully my church retreat this week can be good for me. The new school year brings me a lot of excitement, but the fear of the unknown really brings me down.

The Future’s Possibilites

07.29.15

I’m honestly really scared of all the future could offer or could let me down in. And I know it’s not good to worry so much, but it’s so hard for me not to worry about things like this. Maybe that’s one of the reasons why things don’t end up too badly. 

The M&Ms Store in the Age of Minions

Infinitely Full Of Hope

minion crucified

I visited M&Ms World in Leicester Square this Tuesday, for the first time in rather a long time, but to be honest with you I’m not sure why they bother calling it M&Ms World at all anymore. The whole thing is just Minions.

As many of you will know, I’ve thought and written quite extensively about the M&Ms store in the past. From the moment I first saw the M&Ms store, in October 2011, I was completely fascinated with it. Posing as an amusingly left-field attempt to market a hard-shelled chocolate candy, the M&Ms store in fact represented the attempt to replicate the entire world, in M&Ms form. Aside from the sweet itself, you could buy anything at all in the M&Ms store, filtered and distorted through the prism of the five M&Ms character-candies: not just food but clothing; domestic appliances; farming equipment; all of the most terrible engines…

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Read as Yourself: Ben Marcus on New American Fiction and the Art of the Anthology

Flavorwire

Later this month, Vintage Contemporaries will publish New American Stories, a richly variegated anthology of American short stories edited by Ben Marcus. The collection, which Marcus put together more as a playlist or mixtape than a “museum piece,” is a stirring arrangement that presents a strong case for the American short story as a vital, living thing. And, like unmediated life, it is uncategorizable.

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YOU ARE WHAT YOU DO (the most of) //Guest Blog

Sara Glancy is The Audition Rep Matchmaker

A follow up post inspired by Sara Glancy’s post

“Why It’s Time To Call Bullshit on The ‘Starving Artist’ Myth”

My name is Christopher Gabriel Núñez, I am a writer / actor / rapper and I haven’t worked a survival job in over a year.

Let’s be clear about one thing: The “starving artist” myth was invented by people with a different value system than you, if you are, in fact, an artist.

The starving artist myth was invented by the ancestors of people who spend seven hundred dollars on white noise alarm clocks at Sharper Image but would tell Itzhak Perlman to get a job if they saw him playing violin in Grand Central Station.

Fuck those people.

Recently, one of my favorite artists, EL-P, when asked by Adult Swim to talk about what it takes to make a living in the music industry, said something that…

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ALL OF A SUDDEN I MISS EVERYONE (EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY) |Michael Prihoda

VAGABOND CITY

it’s natural to be afraid,
watching
the birth and death of the day.
this is your
catastrophe
and the cure,
saying so long, lonesome,
and welcome, ghosts.
will you ever not
be haunted, asking
“what do you go home to?”

—–

Michael Prihoda was born in the Midwest. He is still there. He is the founding editor of After the Pause literary magazine and he spends a lot of time watching Modern Family when he should be writing. He tweets @michaelprihoda and blogs at michaelprihoda.wordpress.com.

Note: these poems entirely constructed from the song titles of music albums, said album becoming the poem’s title. The genre is experimental found poetry. The artist can be found here.

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Jane Austen, Programming Languages, and Being “That Guy” in the Writing Class

The Incompetent Writer

Did you read the Buzzfeed piece that came out last month, about writing workshops and Pride and Prejudice, by Shannon Reed? “If Jane Austen Got Feedback From Some Guy In A Writing Workshop.”

1436878433_full.png Photo credit: Buzzfeed and Dan Meth

You should. It’s very funny.

Dear Jane,
I don’t usually read chick lit, but I didn’t hate reading this draft of your novel, which you’re calling Pride and Prejudice. I really liked the part where Elizabeth and her aunt and uncle went on a road trip, which reminded me of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (also about a road trip — check it out!).

I won’t lie. I like to think I’m not as sexist and priggish as this guy. Still, parts of Reed’s piece made me cringe in self-recognition.

I winced.

In a writing workshop, it’s easy (easy at least for me) to develop the exact tone (superior…

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What’s in a name?

Heather Matarazzo

This is not a typical blog piece, though nothing about me is typical, so it fits appropriately.

I have been hesitant to write anything about my life that is deeply personal, because that requires an incredible willingness on behalf of the writer to be vulnerable and honest. However, I am always up for a challenge.

I’m 9 or 10 years old. I’ve snuck into my parents’ bedroom and am quietly walking across their carpet, praying that I don’t make a sound. I open their closet and find the brown metal box. My heart is pounding, hands shaking. I crouch down, balancing on the balls of my feet, ready to jump up and escape at the potential first creak of the stairs. Silence. So far so good. I lift the top up slowly. It doesn’t betray me by squeaking. I’m grateful. My little fingers search through the vanilla colored tabs labeled…

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